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Variable Rate increase by 0.25%



Bank of Canada has raised their overnight rate by 0.25%, bringing it to 4.50%. Which for most lenders will likely increase their Prime rate to 6.70% from the previous 6.45%.



 


This change will have an impact on those with a Variable Rate Mortgage or Home Equity Line of Credit. It will mean a $14 a month payment increase for every $100,000.


Those with a fixed rate mortgage won't be affected by raising rates until they come up for renewal.



 


What is the Bank of Canada Overnight Rate?

The overnight rate is generally the interest rate that large banks use to borrow and lend from one another in the overnight market.


The Bank of Canada holds this Key Lending rate. They might lower it to encourage borrowing and spending OR they may increase it to curb inflation and debt levels.


Major lenders typically raise their prime rate when there is a hike. Thats the number they use to set interest rates for loans and mortgages.


Unlike a fixed rate where one is locked in to their rate, those in a variable rate will be affected by these changes. Home owners with fixed rate mortgages won't be affected until they have to renew.



Should I lock into a Fixed Rate now?

Historically variable rates have shown to save you more money in the long run.

A few things you should consider before locking into a Fixed rate is:

  • Are you planning to sell your home within the next 3yrs? Then we would highly recommend you stay in your variable rate mortgage.

  • Can your budget handle a payment increase if rates go up?

  • Will you be putting extra money down on your mortgage each month? If so, the savings from a variable rate can help you pay down your mortgage faster.

If you are considering locking in, give us a call to discuss first. We have a fun little calculator to help you forecast your savings if you decide to stay with your variable rate.



 

Source: First National - one of Canada's largest non-bank mortgage lenders, offering both commercial mortgages and residential mortgage solutions.


Today, the Bank of Canada increased its overnight benchmark interest rate 25 basis point to 4.50% from 4.25% in December. This is the eighth time since March 2022 that the Bank has tightened money supply to address inflation.


While the headline increase will certainly make news, it is the Bank’s accompanying commentary on its future moves that will capture the most attention. We summarize the Bank’s observations below, including its forward-looking comments on the potential for future rate increases.


Canadian inflation

  • Inflation has declined from 8.1% in June to 6.3% in December, reflecting lower gasoline prices and, more recently, moderating prices for durable goods

  • Despite this progress, Canadians are still “feeling the hardship” of high inflation in their essential household expenses, with persistent price increases for food and shelter

  • Short-term inflation expectations remain elevated and while year-over-year measures of core inflation are still around 5%, 3-month measures have come down, suggesting that core inflation has “peaked”

Canadian economic and housing market performance

  • The Bank estimates Canada’s economy grew by 3.6% in 2022, slightly stronger than was projected in the Bank’s Monetary Policy Report in October, however it projects that growth is expected to “stall through the middle of 2023,” picking up later in the year

  • Canadian GDP growth of about 1% is forecast for 2023 and rising to about 2% in 2024, little changed from the Bank’s October outlook

  • The economy remains in “excess demand” and the labour market remains “tight” with unemployment near historic lows and businesses reporting ongoing difficulty finding workers

  • However, there is “growing evidence” that restrictive monetary policy is slowing activity especially household spending

  • Consumption growth has moderated from the first half of 2022 and “housing market activity has declined substantially”

  • As the effects of interest rate increases continue to work through the economy, spending on consumer services and business investment is expected to slow

  • Weaker foreign demand will likely weigh on Canadian exports

  • This overall slowdown in activity will allow supply to “catch up” with demand

Global economic performance and outlook

  • The Bank estimates the global economy grew by about 3.5% in 2022, and will slow to about 2% in 2023 and 2.50% in 2024 -- a projection that is slightly higher than the Bank’s forecast in October

  • Global economic growth is slowing, although it is proving more resilient than was expected at the time of the Bank’s October Monetary Policy Report

  • Global inflation remains high and broad-based although inflation is coming down in many countries, largely reflecting lower energy prices as well as improvements in global supply chains

  • In the United States and Europe, economies are slowing but proving more resilient than was expected at the time of the Bank’s October Monetary Policy Report

  • China’s abrupt lifting of pandemic restrictions has prompted an upward revision to the Bank’s growth forecast for China and “poses an upside risk to commodity prices”

  • Russia’s war on Ukraine remains a significant source of uncertainty

  • Financial conditions remain restrictive but have eased since October, and the Canadian dollar has been relatively stable against the US dollar

Outlook

Taking all of these factors into account, the Bank decided today’s policy rate increase was necessary and justified.

However, the Bank also offered this important piece of news: “If economic developments evolve broadly in line with (its) outlook, Governing Council expects to hold the policy rate at its current level while it assesses the impact of the cumulative interest rate increases.”


That sounds positive, but as is customary, the Bank also noted that it is prepared to increase the policy rate further if needed to return inflation to its 2% target. It also added the usual language that it “remains resolute in its commitment to restoring price stability for Canadians.”


Although the Bank did not say it, the bottom line is Canadians will have to wait and see what comes next.

Next touchpoint


March 8, 2023 is the Bank’s next scheduled policy interest rate announcement. First National will be on hand to provide an executive summary the same day. For other capital market insights in between, please visit the Resources page of our website on a regular basis.

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